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E-commerce & Circularity: Contradiction or Opportunity


The rise of e-commerce has significantly transformed the retail industry and has brought about a new era of convenience and accessibility for consumers. However, as the volume of online sales continues to grow, concerns about its environmental impact are also increasing. The concept of a circular economy offers a potential solution to these concerns. But is e-commerce compatible with a circular economy, or do they contradict each other?


On the one hand, e-commerce could be seen as a contradiction to the principles of a circular economy. The traditional linear economic model is characterized by a 'take-make-use-dispose' approach, where resources are extracted, processed into products, used, and then discarded as waste. This approach has been the basis of our economic system for centuries, but it is unsustainable and creates huge amounts of waste and pollution. A circular economy, on the other hand, seeks to keep resources in use for as long as possible and minimize waste by promoting recycling, reuse, and regeneration of materials.


However, e-commerce can also offer opportunities for a more circular economy. One of the main advantages of e-commerce is the potential for greater efficiency in the supply chain, reducing transportation costs and emissions. It can also enable better tracking and management of products, reducing waste and improving the recovery of materials. For example, e-commerce platforms can facilitate the resale of used products, enabling them to be reused by other consumers rather than being thrown away.


The European Union's Green Deal is an ambitious program aimed at creating a sustainable, circular economy. It includes a range of measures to reduce waste, increase recycling, and promote more sustainable production and consumption patterns. One of the key proposals is the development of a 'digital product passport,' which would provide information on the environmental impact of products throughout their lifecycle. This would enable consumers to make more informed choices and encourage producers to design products that are more durable and easier to repair and recycle.


A digital product passport would also help to reduce the environmental impact of e-commerce by providing information on the sustainability of products sold online. Consumers could make more informed choices about the products they buy, selecting those with lower environmental impacts, while e-commerce platforms could use the information to promote more sustainable products and reduce the sale of products with high environmental impacts.


In conclusion, e-commerce and the circular economy are not necessarily contradictory. While e-commerce may have negative environmental impacts, it also offers opportunities for greater efficiency and resource conservation. By promoting a more circular approach to production and consumption, and by leveraging the potential of data, we can create a more sustainable and resilient economy. The development of a digital product passport is a promising step towards this goal, enabling us to make more informed choices and encouraging more sustainable production and consumption patterns.


Growth vs flow; centralised and maximised vs small an local; commercial seduction vs actual need. I always wonder when will we finally manage to bring it all together.   The key could be the development of a 'digital product passport,' which would provide information on the environmental impact of products throughout their lifecycle. This would enable consumers to make more informed choices and encourage producers to design products that are more durable and easier to repair and recycle.
Ecommerce & Circular Economy: Contradiction or Opportunity


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